Central park village project

2004

Housing Authority makes new Central Park proposal

The Tampa Housing Authority unveiled plans Tuesday to redevelop Central Park Village, a public housing project northeast of downtown.

The proposal calls for selling nearly half of the housing authority's 28 acres at the corner of Cass Street and Nebraska Avenue. Public housing units would be built on the remaining land.

Housing Authority sketched out the concept for board members at a workshop they plan to give it more formal consideration.

Last year, Central Park was at the center of a proposed 157-acre master-planned community envisioned by Civitas, a for-profit developer. Hillsborough County commissioners crushed the idea in January, refusing to grant tax incentives to get construction going.

The Housing Authority pursued a backup plan, applying for a $20-million federal grant to tear down and rebuild the aging, dilapidated neighborhood, but federal officials rejected that. Now, the authority is taking matters into its own hands.

"We cannot afford to wait," told to board members Tuesday.

The plan would increase the number of public housing units in Central Park from 482 to 590. Renderings of the project show five- and six-story buildings with canopied windows at street level and wide landscaped boulevards.

"It cannot look like affordable housing," "It has to look like well-done housing that's occupied by people paying affordable rates."

The parcel developed by the private sector would contain market-rate housing.

The Housing Authority hopes to pay for the $56-million project with $20.9-million in low-income tax credits; $28.7-million from the Hillsborough Financing Authority; $5.8-million acquired through a Housing and Urban Development program that issues $1,100 for each public housing unit demolished; and $1-million in Housing Authority capital funds.

2004

Tampa Fails In Grant Bid To Rebuild Housing


The federal government has rejected Tampa's bid for a $20 million grant to replace the dilapidated Central Park Village public housing complex.
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Thursday that Daytona Beach is the only Florida city to receive some of this year's $433 million Hope VI revitalization grant money.

``We're not going to throw a pity party and hang our heads,'' `We're going to have to put together another plan to replace Central Park. I can't go another two or three years with Central Park the way it is.''

The authority had asked for $20 million to help replace the 486-unit complex north of downtown, a job estimated to cost at least $80 million.

The Hillsborough County Commission in January derailed a partnership between the Tampa Housing Authority and private developers that called for swapping land and redeveloping 157 acres between downtown and Ybor City.

The housing authority wanted to apply for the Hope VI grant jointly with the Civitas development company but was forced to send a solo application when the county commission balked at creating special taxing districts to help pay for infrastructure improvements.

The overall Civitas plan called for more than $80 million in tax money to help pay for roads, waterlines and other infrastructure.

 

Some steel-framed housing generated by the Civitas development company in east Tampa is nearly complete and ready to be leased.
The five buildings featuring a mix of town houses and apartments along east Columbus Drive were supposed to be an example of the housing Civitas wanted to build in central Tampa neighborhoods. The company began construction on the model homes in December and continued building after its grand redevelopment plan was derailed by county commissioners in January.

The company had proposed building $125,000 lofts and $600,000 town homes in the Central Park neighborhood and hundreds more steel prefabricated homes throughout the city. The plan fell apart when city and county officials couldn't agree on creating a special district to use tax money generated in Central Park to help pay for an estimated $80 million in infrastructure.

 

 

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